Web Publishist

Icon

The news and online journalism industry through the eyes of a young Web publishist.

4 ways a paper’s Web site can use blogs without overstretching reporters

A lot of titles will say that their reporters simply do not have the time to pen a blog on top of their responsibilities as a reporter. I can sympathize with that. But that isn’t a good reason not to have a blog section at all.

Here are four opttions that editors have for maintaining a blog section without having to expend the time and energy of an already over-stretched reporting staff.

  • Guest blogs: Enlist the help of well-known local personalities, in any number of trades or positions, and commission them to write blog posts on specific topics. I visited The Daily Telegraph at its London headquarters last week, and this is exactly what they did. They took the news of the day, then phoned people and commissioned them to write a blog post about this subject. This way you stay relevant, pay only for what you need, and enable your staff to stay on track with their respective beats
  • Bloggers as staff: Hire part-time or freelance-based bloggers to write on specific subjects a few days a week. This gives you the freedom to tell someone when you need a blog post, or when you don’t, but you’re never without someone available to you to write a blog. An added perk over guest blogs is that this person would likely be a professional blogger, or at the very least someone who understands the basics of blogging. Therefore the final product will, likely, be better.
  • Bloggers as interns: Most interns flooding into newsrooms today are what are known as “digital natives” so they likely will already know what a blog is, how they’re supposed to look, and what the difference is between a good and bad blog. Through the interviewing process you’ll be able to find out about their specific talents, insights, and what they feel they would bring to the publication as an active blogger.
  • Bloggers as community members: This is similar to the first point, of bloggers as guests. But what I’m referring to here is the idea of having, say, a person on a city council, or a community’s fire chief/police chief/hospital director being brought in to write blog posts on the paper’s Web site. A sort of “from the source” blog. You do run the chance that these people won’t know how to properly blog, however that could be overcome with only some basic training. This would encourage futher engagement with the community and bolster the title’s image as being that community’s paper, not the paper that reports on that community.

A major pitfall that every editor should be sure to avoid is offering blog posting priveleges to corporate entities. The money would likely be tempting, but when you do that, you will be sacrificing the trust that your community has in the paper.

About these ads

Filed under: community journalism, newspaper websites, , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: